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KINGSWELLS HOME
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EMAIL US
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COMMUNITY COUNCIL
Who's who
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MP and MSP
KINGSWELLS SCHOOL
Children's Work
Sports
News
Children's Council
PTA
MEETING PLACES
Village Hall
Community Centre
Webster Park
WORSHIP
Church of Scotland
Episcopal Church
THINGS TO DO
Sports
Clubs
Action Groups
Youth Activities
Teens Topics
Kids Stuff
Nursery Care
POLICE
Crime Update
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Community Bobby
CLASSIFIED
For Sale
Wanted
Local Businesses
Local Services
ENVIRONMENTAL
Improving Kingswells
Broadband
Planning Permission

Residents Associations
Kingswells in bloom
Western P Route
Park n Ride
Transport Issues
Buses
ANIMAL LIFE
Guide Dogs for the Blind
Walker's Diary
Rebecca's Diary
Parsley's Diary
Livery and Studs
Veterinary Services
Pets Corner
MISCELLANEOUS
Eat in/out
Picture Gallery

Just for a Laugh
Useful web sites
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Disclaimer Statement
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Improving Kingswells

Updated: 14 July 2004

THANK YOU KINGSWELLS FOR HELPING US GET IT SORTED: Aberdeen City Council's Waste Aware team would like to thank the residents of Kingswells for doing such a great job so far in responding to the kerbside collections. There are a large number of households that are making the effort to put their Black Box and Waste Aware White Bag out for collection.

Here is just a quick reminder of what can be put in your BLACK BOX and WHITE BAG.

You can recycle the following materials in your Kerbside BLACK BOX:

∑ Food and drink cans

∑ Glass bottles & jars

∑ Plastic bottles

You can recycle the following materials in your Waste Aware WHITE BAG:

∑ Paper (all types)

∑ Clean cardboard - Please tear cardboard packaging so that it fits within your WASTE AWARE WHITE BAG. Any excess packaging should be taken to your nearest recycling point.

Please help us to get it sorted:

∑ Rinse cans,

∑ Remove lids and rinse glass bottles & jars

∑ Rinse, remove lids and flatten plastic bottles to save space

∑ Flatten cardboard and tear it to fit inside the Waste Aware White bag.

∑ Remove plastic windows from envelopes.

∑ All your recyclates (materials that can be recycled) should fit into your Kerbside BLACK BOX and Waste Aware WHITE BAG. If you have excess Recyclates, please take them to your local Recycling Centre or Point.

"Overall we are very happy with the recyclates that are being left for collection there are however a few things that some residents could do to help us further," says Linda Jordinson &endash; Waste Marketing Officer

"We are only able to recycle glass bottles and jars and not other types of glass such as pyrex dishes, windowpane glass or drinking glasses. These burn at different temperatures to standard glass bottles and jars and cause contamination. It is also important to remember that the crews have to physically separate the items in your Black Box as it is collected so broken glass is a safety hazard and can cause serious injury, so we would like to ask residents to only put whole glass bottles and jars in their Black Box."

"Another challenge is excess packaging, this should be torn so that it fits within your Waste Aware White Bag. This large cardboard does not fit in the side loader vehicle and can cause the vehicle to jam so the crews have been asked not to collect any cardboard packaging that does not fit inside your Waste Aware White Bag. Any excess packaging should be taken to your nearest recycling point.

A small reminder card may be left in you kerbside box, which will give residents some information if we are unable to collect any of the items left. Someone may be unhappy when they come home to find that some items were not recycled and we would like to encourage them to remain positive and thank the householders for their efforts and explain why the items left could not be collected for recycling.

Here is the information that is provided on the leaflet.

Material

Type

Sorry, we cannot recycle these materials because…

Glass

Broken mixed glass

This cannot be separated into the different colours.

Drinking glasses

These types of glass are resistant to heat and breakage and are difficult to process.

Pyrex

Light bulbs

These contain a combination of both glass and metals.

Window pane glass

Spectacles

The lenses in spectacles cannot be recycled with glass bottles and jars. Try to take them to your optician who can send them to be reused.

Other Plastics

Margarine tubs

These are made from different types of plastic. We can only accept plastic bottles.

Plastic bags

Plastic food trays

Polystyrene

Yoghurt pots

Other Wastes

Aerosol cans

These contain gasses, which can be dangerous when squashed.

Large cardboard packaging

These are too big for collection. Please tear cardboard packaging so that it fits within your WASTE AWARE WHITE BAG. Any excess packaging should be taken to your nearest recycling point.

Crisp packets

These are made up of a combination of paper, foil and plastic which is difficult to separate.

Wallpaper

This type of paper has glues on the back.

Finally please remember only items that fit within your Black Box and Waste Aware White Bag will be collected we cannot collect recyclates in any other containers. (Posted 14.7.2004)


Kingswells undiscovered treasure! We now have a delightful amenity accessible from Kingswells &endash; the new community woodland set out between Sheddocksley and Kingswells. As the route information boards have not yet been placed at the ends of the paths which start from Kingswells, perhaps some residents have not yet discovered this treasure! Old existing paths have been enhanced by two new footbridges over the Bucksburn and new paths have been created in an area which must be unique to exist within a city boundary.

Proceed as follow!

Start on the path which leaves Kingswells Crescent between the Concraig houses and the Bucksburn (opposite Wellside Wynd) Continue through the grassed area and follow the path to the burn where you will find a new footbridge and board walk. Turn right on the path after crossing the burn. You will eventually reach a Board with a map of the paths.

Orientation is easier if (in your mind!) you turn the board through 90° so that the north arrows would point to the top of the map! Continue on your path and you will come to the second bridge. Cross the burn and follow the track through the line of beech trees. You can branch off into the new planting to the Sheddocksley playing field. If you continue straight on through the beech trees you will come to Fernhill Cottage. The bar across the path has been placed by the farmer to stop cattle (not walkers!) escaping. It is easy lifted- and replaced! Turn right onto the farm track which will lead you back to Kingswells.

Alternatively start out on the path which leaves Kingswells Avenue between Cromar Gardens and Midmar View. Walk on past the point which gives fine views over the fields, the town, the sea and Buchan and follow the track past Gillahill Croft and the farm. You will reach Fernhill cottage &endash; turn left just beyond the cottage and you can do the circuit described above - but in reverse!

The area is delightfully rural and diverse. The paths lead through moor land, farmland, woodland and waterside. There is much to observe and enjoy and we hope to have information leaflets in due course.

The paths give excellent 'keep-fit' walks, doggy- walks and perhaps most of all, family walks &endash; these are rustic picnic tables and benches here and there.

It is to be hoped that the country atmosphere is not spoilt by of yet more new housing flanking some of the paths and spoiling the views!

(Please follow the country code. Dogs on leads and no litter, please. Cows, sheep and wildlife do not have the digestive system which copes with plastic bags- but they don't know it!)

If you have not discovered these routes yet &endash; explore and enjoy!

By Dot Batchelor of the Kingswells Community Council (Posted 14.5.2004)


HAVE YOU WALKED THE WALK, ON THE BOARDWALK? The new boardwalk allows residents from Kingswells to access the attractive countryside right on their doorstep.
Aberdeen Countryside Project has been working with local landowners, Aberdeen City Council and the Forestry Commission to develop a network of paths to link Bucksburn, Kingswells, Newhills and Sheddocksly. These paths provide routes through attractive countryside close to residential areas and into the newly created Greenferns Community Woodland. Up until now, however, access from Kingswells has remained poor.
To solve this problem ACP volunteers have been busy creating the last "missing link" in the form of a new 100m boardwalk and bridge across the Bucksburn. "It's a whopper… !" reported Iain Mitchell ACP Volunteer Co-ordinator; "...This is surely the longest boardwalk in history !"
The new boardwalk allows the public to access the attractive countryside on the doorstep of Kingswells or to walk through from Bucksburn and Sheddocksley. The path starts from the bridge over the Bucksburn opposite Wellside Wynd in Kingswells. If you would like to know more about this project or volunteering opportunities with ACP, please get in touch on (01224) 7111129 or email us on;
info@acp-countryside.demon.co.uk (Posted 28.4.204)
GARDEN WASTE:
Kerbside Collection Dates.
In Kingswells the collection dates for 2004 will be every second Friday starting April 2. Put your Brown Bin out on the following dates:

April 2, 16, 30.

May 14, 28

June 11, 25

July 9, 23

Aug 6, 20

Sept 3, 17

Oct 1, 15, 29

Nov 12, 26

If you have any queries about Kerbside Collection Dates email : WasteAware@aberdeencity.gov.uk


Your help is needed to find out why has Kingswells has a high heat loss: My name is Iain MacInnes I am a postgraduate student on the MSc Environmental Remote Sensing course at the University of Aberdeen and I would like to outline some of the details of a study I am undertaking in and based on the Kingswells area.

Aim:


The aim of this dissertation is to map the patterns of heat loss in the area of Kingswells. Infoterra Ltd acquired a thermal infrared image of the area for Aberdeen City Council as part of the energy efficiency program run by the Home Energy Department. The Kingswells residential area was found to have unusually high heat loss compared to others areas of the city. This study aims to use the signatures from the thermal image in conjunction with ground truth data to uncover the root causes of this 'anomaly'. A further objective of this study is the creation of classification maps and ancillary ground truth information that can be used to model the thermal responses according the characteristics of the residential properties and land cover.

Objectives:


The main objective of this study is to discover the cause of the apparent heat loss variability in the image. The flights and thermal survey commissioned by Aberdeen City Council were carried out by Infoterra Ltd who delivered an average 'heat loss' rating for each property. Nevertheless, the thermal image has a spatial resolution of 1 x 1m, which permits a more detailed study of the houses and the surrounding area in general.

The ancillary information of building materials, method and pattern of heating and any modifications will be used to form 'signatures' that can be mapped and classified. With the addition of climate data of the Kingswells area and environmental factors such as height, wind, vegetation this data will be modelled to ascertain cause and distribution of heat loss in this zone. The question to be answered is whether a single house can have its thermal signature modelled based on the ancillary data collected. The outcomes of this study will aid Aberdeen City Council in their home energy improvement recommendations.

In order to carry out this study I need volunteers who would be prepared to fill out a one page questionnaire. I am also looking for people who are interested in having a home energy survey done on their properties. Volunteers are instrumental in the success of this study therefore I hope as many of you as possible can help me out with this.

Please contact me by phone or e-mail at: Iain MacInnes,

t01ihm2@abdn.ac.uk 01224 210 220

KINGSWELLS COMMUNITY CLEAN UP IS A MULTINATIONAL EFFORT. The cold weather didn't deter 24 brave souls from tackling the problem of collecting litter from the remoter public areas of Kingswells.

Among those picking up the tough to reach rubbish were American and Australian families doing their bit for their newly adopted local community.

The volunteers collected thirty-six big black bags of rubbish, even though Aberdeen City Council had recently cleaned up in the area.

Organising the event, and helping with the clean up, were Meg and Nick Sands.

Ian Hay of "Clean and Green" had provided rubbish bags, special gloves, and litter pickers.

Those taking part were also given a 'Clean and Green' Cap and useful bags to use to promote recycling.

It is hoped local residents will keep up the momentum of these volunteers and keep the village looking clean and tidy, by placing rubbish and litter in the many bins dotted about Kingswells. (Posted 6.4.2003)

Father and daughter, Brian and Meg McCarthy

Left to right: Burt Noble, Lydia Martin, Meg and Nick Sands and Claire Burt

Left to right: Lydia Martin, Meg Sands, Nick Sands and Councillor Peter Stephens - Clean Up


Countesswells Woods is owned by Forest Enterprise which is a government owned body; ie yours and mine. Their aim is to make money for the government by selling timber. Now, however, Countesswells Woods has a new roll. Its prime object is for recreation, sport, encouragement of wildlife, and diversity of trees and flora. A new aim is also enjoyment of distant views from vantage points. Students and organised groups are encouraged to go there, and if you want advice or maps you can contact their Durris office to get information and give them dates of anything you plan in the woods.

There is a car-counter at the car park entrance and 100,000 + car visits are recorded annually. Many of these, of course will be repeat visits of dog walkers for example. However, Forest Enterprise say Countesswells is the most used of all their car parks in Scotland.

There is a horse trail in the wood, much used and loved by equestrians, which is having a much-needed face-lift at the moment and that is why the wood is now closed . Because the trail is in such bad condition horse riders have had to share the first 300m of the main track with walkers. This is not a happy situation and is soon to end. A new car park is being made (separated from the existing one) for horse wagons and trailers and it will have a new track to join the existing horse trail. The boggy areas will be scraped and drained and bottomed with hard core. This will be topped with 15cm of the wood chips that are being prepared at the moment from the trees, which have just been cut for that purpose. This will give a much longer lasting surface than shredded bark and soft trimmings as used elsewhere. The trail will be wide enough for 2 horses to walk side by side. As the material consolidates, more chipped wood may be needed. The life span is expected to be 6 &endash; 8 years.

If you join the main walking track, you will see the different plantings, which were started in 1860 by the Gemmel family from Countesswells House with big beech trees. The soil is ideally suited to tree growing rather than agriculture and is monitored at intervals. The Forestry Commission acquired the land in the 1930s and large amounts of Sitka spruce and other conifers were planted. Planting and harvesting has been on going at intervals, the last being about 6 years ago. Some thinning has been done recently of mature Sitka spruce but regeneration is encouraged. Opening up the canopy encourages ferns and other ground cover to establish. Fallen trees are allowed to remain and rot on the ground to encourage insect life, which in turn encourages insect-eating bird species. There has been an increase in woodpeckers, tree creepers and other insect feeders. Buzzards and jays have arrived in the last 10 years and owls are returning. These fallen trees must be made safe when so many of the public visit the woods.

There are red and grey squirrels in the wood. The grey favours the beech trees, which have formed corridors which enable them to travel long distances. Some beech is to be cut, to break these corridors in a bid to confine the grey squirrels to certain areas. Larch, Norway spruce and small seeded native trees will replace them to encourage the red squirrels. Roe deer, foxes and rabbits are commonly seen and you might even see a weasel if you are lucky. In winter, when the snow is on the ground, different tracks are in abundance. Badgers are known to live in the woods but few people have ever seen them. They lead secret lives in sets dug out of the ground, which are seldom seen by man. They forage at night at the edge of fields on worms and mice and sometimes very young rabbits dug out of their nests. They are a protected species.

Forest Enterprise has long-term on-going plans for Countesswells Woods. They are well aware that the area is very precious to the citizens of Aberdeen and even to the Europeans and Americans who come here to work for the oil companies. Aberdeen City Council did not tell Forest Enterprise that Countesswells was scheduled to become a "settlement" in the new Local Plan after 2016. That means that industry and commercial interests (possibly an out-of-town mall) as well as houses could be built there, perhaps even the Western Peripheral Route. We must protect this jewel in the crown and not let that happen.

By Gill McKenzie , Kingswells

CLEAN UP DAY: The Community Council are having another Cleanup Day on 29th September. People who are interested in joining the Community Council should meet in the Community Centre car park at 2:00pm. A limited number of 'pick-up sticks' and gloves can be provided.

Everyone is welcome.

As a little incentive the volunteers will be included in the draw to identify the first 'Good Neighbour'. The winner of the draw will be entitled to a Carvery Meal for two at The Four Mile House, Kingswells. For more details of the Good Neighbour Scheme, and the rules please see below. GOOD NEIGHBOUR SCHEME

Do you know someone who has done a neighbourly deed? If so, please contact the Community Council with details.

Hope to see you on the 29th.

Together we can make a difference to the appearance of Kingswells. Kingswells Community Council (Posted 16.9.2002)

GOOD NEIGHBOUR SCHEME: Many of the comments from the recent poll asked what others are going to do to improve Kingswells. While Kingswells Community Council (KCC) is working hard on some of the major issues affecting the village, the truth is we can all make a difference.

KCC would like to encourage the residents of Kingswells to be 'good neighbours'. This does not necessarily mean keeping a perfect garden or not shouting at the local kids. What we want to encourage are selfless acts. We need to consider how our actions affect others.

KCC would like to know of acts that the residents of Kingswells are performing that could be classed as 'neighbourly'. The nominations will be reviewed each month and a winner will be selected. The winner will receive a voucher for a Carvery Meal For Two from the Four Mile House, Kingswells, and will be identified in the Kingswells News and on the website.

As examples of being a good neighbour KCC would like to make the following nominations:

1. The Chemist for sweeping up broken glass from the shopping area.

2. Mr. X for taking a bin bag with him when walking the dog, and picking up rubbish.

3. Mrs. Y for taking extra 'doggie bags' with her and handing them to people who have forgotten their bag.

4. Aberdein Considine for picking up rubbish around the shopping area.

5. The helpers for the local football team for ensuring no rubbish is left lying about after a football match.

6. All the residents who trim back hedges and shrubs so that they don't cause a nuisance to people using footpaths.

7. All the skateboarders who use the Park and Ride car park.

Nominations can be made via the post boxes in the community centre and post office or by email to communitycouncil@kingswells.com. Only the winning nomination will be removed, so each nomination has more than one chance to win a 'Good Neighbour Award'.

Together, we can make a big difference to Kingswells.

Let us all be GOOD NEIGHBOURS. (Posted 29 March 2002)

PATHS FOR KINGSWELLSCan you help a group of Postgraduate Student in the RRRP (Rural and Regional Resources Planning) course at the Universty of Aberdeen. They are planning to distribute a questionnaire on 'Paths for Kingswells' - a proposal for establishing a network of paths. Can you help by filling in their questionnaire - to be distributed very soon.
Completed questionaaires can be returned to: The Kingswells Community Centre or the Alldays Shop. (Posted 7.2.2002)

The Environmental Statement for the planning application for a new football stadium at Kingswells is expected to be submitted to the City Council at the end of next week. Planners will then begin their detailed assessment and there will be widespread consultation. A target date of Wednesday, January 16 has been set for the relevant advertisements with a 28 day period for consultation.
As well as the Statement being made available for inspection at the Planning Department it is proposed that a copy will be displayed in all main libraries. An 'executive summary' will also be prepared to distribute to greater numbers. (Posted 6.1.2002)

Kingswells Recycling Centre: With all the comments posted about environmental concerns in Kingswells, how do people feel about having a recycling centre? I put out my wheelie-bin every Thursday like the other inhabitants and it is normally pretty full. And a good 50% of it could be recycled i.e. green / clear glass, plastic, paper and cardboard to mention a few. When we lived in Aberdeen city centre it was easy to take our recyclables to a depot.

Surely in a community the size of Kingswells, there must be scope to let us recycle our waste products to do our bit to ensure a cleaner environment for our children and our children's children. If we want to make forward progress on environmental issues, it's got to start from home! (Posted 15.8.2001) Russ

(An open letter from Dr Tom Straiton to everyone living in Kingswells). Posted 7.5.2001

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN KINGSWELLS. I expect that many of us chose to live in Kingswells because of its convenient location and attractive rural surroundings. In many ways it continues to be a pleasant place to live. However, threats to our local environment are growing at an alarming rate. We are now at a turning point. Decisions made for us, or by us, in the next few months and years will be crucial in determining whether or not Kingswells remains a "nice place to live".

The litter problem is now endemic and it continues to annoy many of us. It not only shows us up badly against other "good" areas of the city, but demeans us as people. The wheelie bins have helped a little, but the real problem remains the indiscriminate (and illegal) dropping of litter. It is easy just to blame youngsters for this. What about those adults, however, who dump their leylandii and used Christmas trees illegally in woodland areas, on the mistaken assumption that they will quickly decay ? Who are the irresponsible pet owners who foul up our green areas twice over by discarding nicely filled and non-biodegradable "doggy bags" ? How many adults are quite content to walk past heaps of litter daily in the hope that someone else will eventually pick it up ? Then we have the City Council, which generally does a very good job in tidying up some of the planted areas, but seems content to leave many other green areas litter-infested. In addition, their grass-cutters have an uncanny knack of shredding drinks cans and all sorts of plastic waste, despite the fact that it is clearly visible and could easily be picked up. This is particularly unacceptable when it is turning up on the playing-field where our youngsters play football. The verges on the main perimeter road around Kingswells are a disgrace - but never mind, it will soon be time for the grass-cutters to do their annual shredding again ! Litter clean-ups by the Scouts and others should earn our praise, but they are not the long-term solution. The situation will only be resolved satisfactorily when we adopt zero tolerance to litter, stop walking by on the other side, and demand our rights to a clean environment.

Annoying though it is, litter is a relatively minor threat to our local environment. After all, it can always be picked up. The same does not apply to the Western Peripheral Route (WPR) or the massive new building project planned by Stewart Milne. On the former, it is easy to be seduced by the clamour of demands for the new road by some councillors and politicians. As yet, however, there is not a shred of hard evidence that the road would actually reduce traffic flow into the city. On the other hand, there is plenty of evidence from elsewhere that bypasses simply lead to even more traffic and congestion. The WPR would cause massive and permanent damage to some of the best countryside around Aberdeen, particularly in the area between Kingswells and Bieldside/Milltimber. It will run very close to the housing in Kingswells, increasing down-wind air pollution, causing constant noise and increased roadside litter. Are people in Kingswells really sure that they want this road ? What has happened to the massive protest of some five years ago which sent representatives of the Roads Department scuttling to their cars after facing a capacity crowd of protesting residents in the Community Centre ?

Plans for the Stewart Milne development at Gillahill appear to have fallen into a black hole in the Planning Department. The lack of communication is worrying. We need to know what is going on. The scale of this project should not be underestimated. It will cause permanent loss of some of the finest remaining countryside in Kingswells, along with the tranquility and very varied wildlife that goes with it. It is difficult to see how it can be justified at all given that Aberdeen's population is now decreasing. Everyone who values our rural setting should take a wander along the farm track which leads from between Cromar Gardens and Midmar View towards Mastrick. All of the very pleasant farmland between the track and the Wellside area will be covered in roads and housing. Is all this worth sacrificing just to make another fast buck for the developers ? If the answer is yes, then I, for one, will be looking for pastures new.

I would welcome any comments you may have on these matters, or on any others relating to the local environment, via the Kingswells web site.

Dr Tom Straiton , Kingswells. Please email your views to: info@kingswells.com

Kingswells Community Conservation Group was formed two years ago. Their aim is to look after and enhance the natural historical environment of Kingswells.

The area is fortunate to benefit from many kinds of wildlife. There are over fifty species of birds and various mammals including the occasional sighting of a roe deer and squirrels.

Achievements to date: The restoration of the stone dyke on Kingswood Drive. [It is now a designated historical monument, and it's now an offence to damage or remove stones from the dyke].

Environmental improvements to the open area around the pond and the small valley of the Bucks Burn [measures to stop the pond silting are being considered].

Tree-planting and the realignment of the path from Kingswood Drive

Future plans: Designate the lower section of the Bucks Burn valley as a local nature reserve - your views are welcome.

Regular litter clean-ups - volunteers welcome and additional "doggie bins"

Local coordinator,Tom Straiton can be contact on 742943 .

Cornerstone are looking for people, who may be, able to spare a few hours a week to help with swimming, sailing, country dancing, arts and crafts, horse riding and lots of other things. Can you help? Would you be interested in becoming a volunteer / befriender for Cornerstone Community Care? Please contact Veronica Ross at Suite 1a Exchange House, Aberdeen


If you can provide assistance or information with any of the above please contact me at: info@kingswells.com A credit will be given to anyone submitting articles and photos used on web site. Claire Burt Web mistress
hat

Join the environment debate about issues that impact on Kingswells. Click on the bulletin board.

 

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The Rules for the Good Neighbour Scheme

1. Nominations for the Good Neighbour Award can be made by anyone for neighbourly acts made by any resident, business or organisation in Kingswells.

2. The nominations should include the name and address of the nominee, a brief description of the 'neighbourly act', and your name and contact details.

3. Nominations to be made to Kingswells Community Council using any of the following methods:

a. By mail to Community Council, c/o Community Centre, Kingswells.

b. The post boxes at the Community Centre, or the Post Office.

c. Email to communitycouncil@kingswells.com

4. Each month the KCC will consider the nominations and select a Good Neighbour. Their decision will be final.

5. The winner will be advertised in the Kingswells News, and the Kingswells website (www.kingswells.com) each month, and will receive a voucher for a Carvery Meal For Two at the Four Mile House, Kingswells. The name and address of the nominee can be withheld if privacy is required. KCC will determine if this is required from the nominee.

6. KCC may ask for some verification to back up the nomination.

7. Other examples of neighbourly act maybe identified in the Kingswells News, and the Kingswells website (www.kingswells.com); but will not receive a 'prize' unless identified as a winner.

8. All nominations, except winners, will be retained and will be considered in future months in addition to any new nominations.

9. Members of KCC and their family can be nominated; but will not be selected as winners.

10. The scheme will run for six months


 

Site Compiled by Claire Burt Email: info@kingswells.com or write to: Kingswells.com 21 Wellside Avenue, Kingswells, Aberdeen, AB15 8EF